The Resource Oppression: a poem. Or, New-England's lamentation of the dreadful extortion and other sins of the times. : Being a serious exhortation to all to repent and turn from the evil of their ways, if they would avert the terrible and heavy judgments of the Almighty that hang over America at this alarming and distressing day, (electronic resource)

Oppression: a poem. Or, New-England's lamentation of the dreadful extortion and other sins of the times. : Being a serious exhortation to all to repent and turn from the evil of their ways, if they would avert the terrible and heavy judgments of the Almighty that hang over America at this alarming and distressing day, (electronic resource)

Label
Oppression: a poem. Or, New-England's lamentation of the dreadful extortion and other sins of the times. : Being a serious exhortation to all to repent and turn from the evil of their ways, if they would avert the terrible and heavy judgments of the Almighty that hang over America at this alarming and distressing day
Title
Oppression: a poem. Or, New-England's lamentation of the dreadful extortion and other sins of the times.
Title remainder
Being a serious exhortation to all to repent and turn from the evil of their ways, if they would avert the terrible and heavy judgments of the Almighty that hang over America at this alarming and distressing day
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Additional physical form
Microform version available in the Readex Early American Imprints series.
Cataloging source
MWA
Citation location within source
  • 10114
  • 2114a
  • 705
Citation source
  • Evans
  • Ford, W.C. Broadsides
  • Wegelin, O. Amer. poetry
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Extortion
  • New England
  • New England
Label
Oppression: a poem. Or, New-England's lamentation of the dreadful extortion and other sins of the times. : Being a serious exhortation to all to repent and turn from the evil of their ways, if they would avert the terrible and heavy judgments of the Almighty that hang over America at this alarming and distressing day, (electronic resource)
Link
https://go.openathens.net/redirector/upsem.edu?url=http://opac.newsbank.com/select/evans/10114
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Part of the library digital collection of Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800
  • Verse in twenty-seven stanzas; first line: Come all you friends to goodness, I pray you to attend
  • Dated [1765] by Evans. However, the theme of extortion suggests to Ford and others that the poem was written about 1777 when this evil was a topic of common concern in the colonies. Cf. Winslow, Ola E. American broadside verse ... New-Haven, 1930, no. 89
  • Woodcuts are the same as those used frequently by Ezekiel Russell who was located at Salem, Mass., in 1776 and early 1777. In February or March, 1777, Russell moved his printing office to nearby Danvers, Mass
  • Text in two columns
Antecedent source
file reproduced from microform
Color
mixed
Control code
000310559
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 sheet ([1] p.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Level of compression
lossless
Other physical details
ill. (relief cuts)
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Reproduction note
Electronic text and image data.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(Sirsi) 000310559
Label
Oppression: a poem. Or, New-England's lamentation of the dreadful extortion and other sins of the times. : Being a serious exhortation to all to repent and turn from the evil of their ways, if they would avert the terrible and heavy judgments of the Almighty that hang over America at this alarming and distressing day, (electronic resource)
Link
https://go.openathens.net/redirector/upsem.edu?url=http://opac.newsbank.com/select/evans/10114
Publication
Note
  • Part of the library digital collection of Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800
  • Verse in twenty-seven stanzas; first line: Come all you friends to goodness, I pray you to attend
  • Dated [1765] by Evans. However, the theme of extortion suggests to Ford and others that the poem was written about 1777 when this evil was a topic of common concern in the colonies. Cf. Winslow, Ola E. American broadside verse ... New-Haven, 1930, no. 89
  • Woodcuts are the same as those used frequently by Ezekiel Russell who was located at Salem, Mass., in 1776 and early 1777. In February or March, 1777, Russell moved his printing office to nearby Danvers, Mass
  • Text in two columns
Antecedent source
file reproduced from microform
Color
mixed
Control code
000310559
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 sheet ([1] p.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Level of compression
lossless
Other physical details
ill. (relief cuts)
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Reproduction note
Electronic text and image data.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(Sirsi) 000310559

Library Locations

  • Charlotte Campus LibraryBorrow it
    5141 Sharon Rd, Charlotte, NC, 28210, US
    35.1425751 -80.833899
  • William Smith Morton Library (Richmond Campus)Borrow it
    3401 Brook Road, Richmond, VA, 23227, US
    37.5789301 -77.4492905
Processing Feedback ...